FUNGI GARDENS - Healing the earth with tasty mushrooms!

Interested in sponsoring a workshop in your area?

Contact us: healing@herbalhealingpathway.com or 250-592-7544

Learn to create a complete ecosystem with cardboard, newspaper, fungi (Stropharia rugoso-annulata), woodchips, a bit of soil, some seeds and plants.

A fungi garden is a food garden consisting of woodchips, soil, edible fungi, and vegetables or herbs. Imagine turning a deficient or damaged growing area into a thriving ecosystem complete with everything from microorganisms, plants, insects, birds, animals and people using primarily wood chips and fungi. Welcome to the Fungi Garden workshop!

Using a carefully calculated organization of wood chips and fungi in a properly chosen location we create the foundation of our future ecosystem. By the addition of some seeds, a bit of soil and whatever plants we want to plant we set the stage for the creation of life. As the spawn breaks down the carbon in the chips and releases oxygen, the seeds and plants begin to use these to grow. Once the spawn fruits and produces its fruits (mushrooms) the insects discover them and eventually lay their larvae in them. Then the birds discover the larvae and while feasting leave behind rich droppings of nitrogen adding to the primordial bed of fertility. Once there is food available in the way of mushrooms, plants and birds, larger animals and people enter the system. Now we have a complete ecosystem. That is why we create Fungi Gardens.

I am presently running new spawn. You can order now but it will be about 1 month ( June 20th) before I am ready to ship.

Garden Giant Spawn $20.00 per bag (plus calculated shipping)

Calculate shipping: Click here!  Shipping from: Postal Code: V0N 2M2

Check Regular Parcel unless you want to pay more and receive sooner.

1 bag of spawn

size: length 6 x width 6 x height 6

weight: 1.5 lbs

2 bags of spawn: (Save on shipping)

size: length 12 x width 6 x height 6

weight 3 lbs

4 bags of spawn (save on shipping)

size: length 12 x width 6 x height 12

weight 6 lbs

I am presently running new spawn. You can order now but it will be about 1 month ( June 20th) before I am ready to ship.

Pay to Aquiline Communications (V0N 2M2) Fungi Garden Project - Healing the Earth with Edible Mushrooms while Educating Our Children!

Add calculated shipping and price of spawn based on number of bags

Credit Card Options on bottom left!
                                             garden giants we grew at welland orchard

                                             garden giants we grew at welland orchard

                                                       garden giants bleached by the sun

                                                       garden giants bleached by the sun

DISCLAIMER:

If any mushrooms grow out of your woodchip spawn that DO NOT resemble the pictures above (Stropharia rugoso-annulata), please exercise caution and do not eat them until you have positive identification (full description below).

We use natural, non-sterile growing conditions to propagate our mycelium, not an isolated lab environment. Therefore, other spores may be present that can grow alongside the stropharia although the stropharia are agressive and usually dominate other mushrooms. 

Description:

Ecology: Saprobic, growing scattered or gregariously (sometimes in clusters) on woodchips, in gardens, and in other cultivated areas; spring through fall; widely distributed in North America.

Cap: 4-15 cm; convex or broadly bell-shaped at first, becoming broadly convex to flat; sticky when fresh, or dry; smooth; wine red to reddish brown, fading to tan or paler; sometimes developing cracks in old age; the margin sometimes hung with partial veil remnants.

Gills: Attached to the stem; whitish to pale gray at first, later purplish gray to purple-black; close.

Stem: 7-15 cm long; 1-3 cm thick; dry; equal, or with an enlarged base; smooth or fibrous; white, discoloring yellowish to brownish in age; with a thick ring that is finely grooved on its upper surface (and often blackened by spores) and radially split or "cogwheeled" on its underside; base with white mycelial threads.

Flesh: Substantial and white throughout; firm. from mushroomexpert.com

Odor and Taste: Pleasant.

Spore Print: Dark purple-brown to blackish.

Chemical Reactions: KOH on cap surface olive green.

Microscopic Features: Spores 10-14 x 6-9 µ; smooth; broadly elliptical. Chrysocystidia present.

NOTE:  It is recommended that all edible mushrooms be thoroughly cooked before eating.

Important for growing:

·      These mushrooms love heat. Plant in full sun.

.      Mushrooms do not like Chlorine or Chloramine. If you're watering spawn with chloraminated water, that's likely to destroy some of the mycellium,  you can neutralize the chloramine by mixing 1 teaspoon of humic acid per 100 gallons of tap water, according to one company that makes compost-tea brewers. paraphrased for mushrooms from: http://blog.pennlive.com/gardening/2007/12/chloraminetreated_water_in_the.html

·      Plant in small clumps (not scattered as most books recommend) on cardboard with mounds of wood chips between clumps. Start with small area and increase as spawn develops. Optional: Add whole wood under cardboard for longer fruiting.

·      Add some nitrogen fixing plants like crimson clover.

·      Add soil and other plants to create an ecosystem. They support each other.

·      Cover with mulch if chance of freezing.


·      Grow where you frequent, as mushrooms bloom and die quickly.

 

Click on image below to see pictures from

the start of the workshop to six month later!

Fungi Gardens

Creating a complete ecosystem

with cardboard, fungi, woodchips, a bit of soil, some seeds and plants

A fungi garden is a food garden consisting of woodchips, soil, edible fungi, and vegetables or herbs. Imagine turning a deficient or damaged growing area into a thriving ecosystem complete with everything from microorganisms, plants, insects, birds, animals and people using primarily wood chips and fungi. Welcome to the Fungi Garden workshop! Using a carefully calculated organization of wood chips and fungi in a properly chosen location we create the foundation of our future ecosystem. By the addition of some seeds, a bit of soil and whatever plants we want to plant we set the stage for the creation of life. As the spawn breaks down the carbon in the chips and releases oxygen, the seeds and plants begin to use these to grow. Once the spawn fruits and produces its fruits (mushrooms) the insects discover them and eventually lay their larvae in them. Then the birds discover the larvae and while feasting leave behind rich droppings of nitrogen adding to the primordial bed of fertility. Once there is food available in the way of mushrooms, plants and birds, larger animals and people enter the system. Now we have a complete ecosystem. That is why we create Fungi Gardens. Come out and join us in this hands-on experience of soil creation and (sometimes) restoration when we re-invigorate damaged earth. It normally takes 100 to 500 years to form 1 inch of topsoil but we can greatly speed up the process while reaping rich rewards, if we introduce the right fungi.

CBC Radio Interview on Fungi Gardens! (Click Here)

Spore slurry by Peter McCoy

Several mature mushrooms

5 gallon bucket filled with non-chlorinated water

½ to 1 teaspoon of table salt

50 mL or ¼ cup of molasses

Place mushrooms in the broth for 4 to 8 hours

Remove the mushrooms and allow this mixture to sit undisturbed for 24 to 48 hours at 50 to 80°F

The sugars in the liquid will soon stimulate the spores to germinate, sending out the microscopic hyphae. After a day or two you maybe able to see a thin layer of mycelium growing in the broth. At this point you can pour this spore slurry over your desired substrate, crossing your fingers that will take hold.

From Earth Repair by Leila Darwish

If you have any concerns or questions please feel free to contact us at healing@herbalhealingpathway.com

(Contact us if you are interested in hosting a workshop in your area)

Articles:

Plants Communicate Using An Internet Of Fungus

Earthworms And Mushrooms Work As ‘Silviculture’

Why we cook mushrooms!

Paul Stamets - How Mushrooms Can Save Bees & Our Food Supply | Bioneers


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